New publications: “Books in Motion in Early Modern Europe. Beyond Production, Circulation and Consumption” and “Magical Manuscripts in Early Modern Europe The Clandestine Trade In Illegal Book Collections”

We are happy to share the following publication announcements of our associated scholar Prof. Daniel Bellingradt:

Books in Motion in Early Modern Europe. Beyond Production, Circulation and Consumption

Published in Palgrave’s “New Directions in Book History” series, “Books in Motion in Early Modern Europe. Beyond Production, Circulation and Consumption” presents and explores a challenging new approach in book history. This book, edited by Daniel Bellingradt, Paul Nelles, and Jeroen Salman, offers a coherent volume of thirteen chapters in the field of early modern book history covering a wide range of topics and it is written by renowned scholars in the field. The rationale and content of this volume will revitalize the theoretical and methodological debate in book history. The book will be of interest to scholars and students in the field of early modern book history as well as in a range of other disciplines. It offers book historians an innovative methodological approach on the life cycle of books in and outside Europe. It is also highly relevant for social-economic and cultural historians because of the focus on the commercial, legal, spatial, material and social aspects of book culture. Scholars that are interested in the history of science, ideas and news will find several chapters dedicated to the production, circulation and consumption of knowledge and news media.

The volume includes chapter’s by Shanti Graheli (Glasgow), Vivienne Dunstan (Dundee), Malcolm Walsby (Rennes), Joad Raymond (London), Paul Nelles (Ottawa), Andreas Golob (Graz), Joop W. Koopmans (Groningen), Benito Rial Costas (Madrid), Mark Curran (London), Geoffrey Roper (Cambridge), Jeroen Salman (Utrecht), and Daniel Bellingradt (Erlangen).

You can find more information on: https://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9783319533650

Magical Manuscripts in Early Modern Europe The Clandestine Trade In Illegal Book Collections

“Magical Manuscripts in Early Modern Europe The Clandestine Trade In Illegal Book Collections” by Daniel Bellingradt and Bernd-Christian Otto presents the story of a unique collection of 140 manuscripts of ‘learned magic’ that was sold for a fantastic sum within the clandestine channels of the German book trade in the early eighteenth century. Published in Palgrave’s “New Directions in Book History” series, the book will interpret this collection from two angles – as an artefact of the early modern book market as well as the longue-durée tradition of Western learned magic –, thus taking a new stance towards scribal texts that are often regarded as eccentric, peripheral, or marginal. The study is structured by the apparent exceptionality, scarcity, and illegality of the collection, and provides chapters on clandestine activities in European book markets, questions of censorship regimes and efficiency, the use of manuscripts in an age of print, and the history of learned magic in early modern Europe. As the collection has survived till this day in Leipzig University Library, the book provides a critical edition of the 1710 selling catalogue, which includes a brief content analysis of all extant manuscripts. The study will be of interest to scholars and students from a variety of fields, such as early modern book history, the history of magic, cultural history, the sociology of religion, or the study of Western esotericism.

The chapter that provides a critical and annotated edition of the forbidden book trade catalogue, and a brief content analysis of each manuscript of the magical collection, is open access: https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/bbm%3A978-3-319-59525-2%2F1.pdf

You can find more information on http://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9783319595245#aboutBook and https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-319-59525-2

 

 

 

 

 

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